ITS TIME WE TALKED

As a school we are very much aware of the rising levels of sexting, and the easily accessible online world that our girls must navigate.  Body and self-esteem issues, respectful relationships and student safety are all offshoots of a quick click society.  Today’s newsletter highlights some of the online parenting resources that you as parents can use to assist you with those difficult discussions. 

A wide range of information is available to parents online to help you understand the issues associated with pornography, sexting and cyber safety and support your children effectively.  Here is a brief summary of some sites and interesting articles. 

SEXTING & CYBERSAFETY 

Esafety
A great first stop for parents is: Esafety resource.

Bully Stoppers.
Parent resources, including advice sheets on issues such as sexting, inappropriate content and social media: Bullystoppers resource 

Media Smarts 
Information on a range of cyber issues, including pornography, cyberbullying and gender representation.  Includes tip sheets, e-tutorials for parents and educational games introducing young people to key ideas in digital and medial literacy. Media Smarts

Are you web-aware? Checklist for parents: Web Aware

Think U Know? Information to help you understand the online activities young people engage in: ThinkUKnow?

Developing a family agreement or set of rules for technology use. Examples of family online rules or agreements: Tip Sheet: Family Online Rules and Common Sense Media

PORNOGRAPHY 

It’s time we talked website 

Created as part of the community education project Reality & Risk:  Pornography, young people and sexuality, the website provides information about pornography including parent tip sheets: It’s Time We Talked

 

‘How to talk to your teens about pornography’
 

Despite the absence of definitive research linking pornography exposure during adolescence to negative outcomes for teenagers and noted the ethical impossibility of conducting the kinds of studies that might prove, or disprove, such links. In spite of the lack of evidence of harm, researchers feel uneasy about the messages teenagers might take from pornography and suggested that “at a minimum” parents should be talking with their teenagers about sexuality in general and porn in particular: How to talk to your teenagaer about pornography